The place where artists and writers with Maine connections are showcased.

Maine’s mystical ships by Ramona du Houx – May 2016 exhibit Featured

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Seascapes

“Our bodies consist of the same proportion of water as the earth. We are creatures of the sea. The draw of the ocean has been written about time and again. There is something more vast and more mysterious about the sea than anything else on earth. It’s something similar to the vastness and mystery of the universe itself. Our planet is just one in our solar system which is connected by the vastness of space. Is the relationship we have with the ocean a microscopic reflection of the relationship our Earth has to space?” said Ramona du Houx.

“How people interact with the ocean, from feeling at one under sail with the winds at the back to simply watching waves lap the shores, transmits a calmness, a wholeness. That peace is something I wish to convey in my work.”

Ramona du Houx’s photography Featured

Ramona has been to many events in her 32 year career as a photographer and has had the privilege of capturing the excitement and atmosphere surrounding the events.

“Ramona du Houx provides fine, thorough, and complete photography and writing services and doesn’t stop until she gets the job done to the satisfaction of the client she is working for.”
– Bangor Citycouncilor Joe Baldacci

Here is a small sample of her work. For more please click here. Or contact her directly.Rates vary per assignment and needs. Read more

Maine’s Equal Protection of the Laws: America’s 14th Amendment Exhibit

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Maine’s Equal Protection of the Laws: America’s 14th Amendment exhibit opens on Thursday, September 22nd and runs through December 22nd, 2016.
The exhibit will be at the Michael Klahr Center on the campus of the University of Maine at Augusta, 46 University Drive in Augusta.
Themes depicted relate to many areas of American society covered by the amendment: including due process, liberty, gender and sexuality, race, legal protections, equality in the workplace, housing, education, law enforcement, rights of the incarcerated, tolerance, and local, state, and federal representation
The exhibit is being hosted by the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine, in conjunction with the Harlow Gallery of the Kennebec Valley Art Association, with support from the Maine Humanities Council and associated program support by the Maine Arts Commission.
The Holocaust and Human Rights Center is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. or weekends and evenings by appointment or when other events are being held.

Blue Heron in Solon, Maine by Ramona du Houx

 

When the Sacred Waterbird, Blue Heron, comes to you in the Native American Totem tradition it gives you a lesson of self-reflection.

Heron “medicine” teaches us about the power of knowing ourselves so that we can discover our gifts and face our challenges.  We learn to accept all of our feelings and opinions and not to deny the emotions and thoughts that go with them.

The Blue Heron encourages us to follow our intuition and to take the empowering journey into self-realization.

 

The slide show:

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Herons are symbols of good luck and patience in many Native American tribes. Read more

Maine’s Polar Bear & Co. Books

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To view more about these books please go HERE. So view the latest publications please go Here.

Polar Bear & Company has been publishing high-quality works of cultural significance since 1998, with over 60 titles, with worldwide distribution.

We produce books that make a difference to our cultural heritage, creative economy and democracy. We strive to enhance the quality of life through literature and art.

We hope to give well-intentioned, creative people avenues for their words, wisdom, wit and other talents so they can reach individuals to create stronger communities.

Polar Bear & Company  publishes non-fiction and fiction writers who bring needed insights to the world.

Democracy flourishes when creativity is allowed freedom of expression.

In 2015 the owners decided to follow the traditional model of non-profit publishing, thereby making Polar Bear & Company an imprint of the Solon Center for Research and Publishing, a non-profit 501(c)3 Maine public benefit company.

Manitou-A Mythological Journey in Time by Ramona du Houx

51QZYE7V75LManitou is all around us, within us. It’s the Land of living imagination, where five adventurous teens sail upriver and into a cosmically balanced atmosphere with the powers of nature.

On the journey,  Gandalf, Polar Bear and other mythological beings make themselves known, as they entertain and show nature’s wonders. All the while, the teens get to know each other better, learning more about themselves and the world they live in.

This isn’t a blockbuster, although being in nature truly can be a mind blowing adventure. Given a chance, children create their own adventures in nature. When so many are growing up with electronic devices, this book gives them an opportunity to experience the world of nature instead, hopefully inspiring them to spend more time outside.© 1999

A Maine boat yard comes to life in A Winter’s Apprentice- John H Willey

By Ramona du Houx

John Willey shares insights into life in a Maine boatyard, where he worked and kept a journal from 1978 to ’79 in his book, A Winter’s Apprentice. John’s perspectives are unique coming from being a scholar and private investigator. He knew he was working amoung a group of outstanding craftsmen and involved in a dying art that he has now preserved in his writings.

“Before it ever leaves its building shed, a yacht will take its makers on unimagined journeys. This one only begins in East Boothbay, Maine,” said Willey.

As the historian John Gardner confirms, until relatively recently boatbuilding was not recorded—the life of the yard crew even less so. Here is a rare and vibrant narrative from a winter apprentice.

“It’s great, it really is great. I can see it, and see it all—smell it, taste it, and feel it. The shop and crew and Paul came through life size. I was there with you, every blessed, excruciating, wonderful minute…“Last night after supper, I sat down with it and didn’t get up until I had finished, about 2 a.m,” endorsed John Gardner, historian, designer and builder of wooden boats, author of books including Building Classic Small Craft.

John Willey enthusiastically recommends others to become apprentices of the trade.

“The practice has worked well for more centuries than we can count. In every one of the great scholarly traditions, including but not limited to law and medicine and teaching, the best of us get that way by first attaching ourselves to the principles of what we want to know, and to the men and women who use and exemplify those principles to grow beyond them.”

He has a special affinity to crafting wood. As a teen growing up at Good Will-Hinckley in central Maine, he made his first boat with a friend, in his free time when he wasn’t avidly reading. Working in a boat yard seemed to be a natural course to take.

“As soon as I began work at Paul’s yard I was dazzled, smitten, and wanted to preserve what I learned as completely as I could. After about four or five weeks it dawned on me I had something close to chapters for a book, along with detailed letters I’d written to my dad,” said John.

Willey sought advise from professionals before completing his book.

“John Gardner answered my first letter to him, and was so enthusiastic and reassuring I thought I actually had a book under way. He was always there, encouraging, and I knew he knew what he was talking about, even when I did not.”

Willey’s stories and sage insights will resonate with any reader who has had to leave one career and transition into another.

John had been an independent private investigator in San Francisco when he was told by his doctor to find less hectic work in a more peaceful setting if he wanted to live longer. So, at midlife, he and his wife returned to Maine.

John has been a farmhand, janitor, jackhammer operator, U.S. Marine, choir member (bass), sailor, private investigator, electrician, boat builder, cabinetmaker, mason, and long served on the board of his beloved Good Will-Hinckley. In the summertime, he paddles an eighteen-foot sea kayak he built and launched in 1997.

Available online and at your local bookstore internationally or directly from the publisher Polar Bear & Company, polarberanadco.org. 207.643.2795.

$14.95

ISBN 978-1-882190-45-4

Photographer Ramona du Houx exhibits at SugarWood Gallery

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FARMINGTON – SugarWood Gallery “Artist of the Month” Ramona du Houx of Solon, will be feted at an Open House Reception on Friday, July 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. during Farmington’s First Friday Art Walk. The public is invited. Refreshments will be served.

du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature.FARMINGTON – SugarWood Gallery “Artist of the Month” Ramona du Houx of Solon, will be feted at an Open House Reception on Friday, July 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. during Farmington’s First Friday Art Walk. The public is invited. Refreshments will be served.

du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature.

“I try to bring the beauty, magic and mystery of nature to viewers by amplifying nature’s essence,” she said.

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du Houx is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan, and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. Gallery Storks has produced an art book of Ramona’s art called: Transformations — Revealing Nature’s Complex Balance. Many of the photos on display are in the book.

“Scientists, innovators, and inventors throughout history took the time to observe nature and her connective rhythms. But now society plugs us into the Internet, and while that can open doors, sometimes too much of being Internet-connected disconnects us from the mysteries of the natural world that are transformational. I want to help show how nature’s interconnectedness can lead us to discoveries about our world and ourselves,” she said.

She uses the camera with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered back in 1979, in New York, uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge. “I never know exactly what the results will be, that’s the exciting part of the creation,” said Ramona.

Ramona’s love for photography continues to be a lifetime affair. At 12 she couldn’t be seen without a camera. By 18 she was teaching photography and industrial design at Collegio San Antonio Abad in Puerto Rico.

During college she worked with three New York City photographers. In 1979 she landed jobs to take political photographs of Sen. Ted Kennedy, and President Jimmy Carter. The same year she discovered her “lightgraph” technique and held her first exhibit in Huntington, Long Island. Excited by the new way of expressing herself she took her “lightgraph” images to the Museum of Modern Art, where they were put on file.

The Zen nature of her work became obvious to Ramona so she continued her studies in art, and philosophy in Kyoto, Japan while teaching. Her travels in the East led to numerous exhibits in Japan and a lifelong connection with the area.

In England and Ireland, she explored the mythology of the region, while raising three children, ghost writing a novel, and forever taking photographs. After returning stateside to Maine, she started a publishing company, Polar Bear & Company, with her husband and was hired as a consultant by a local artist. During this time she also explored more about the mysteries of motion in her lightgraph technique, and wrote for newspapers. By 1998 she was given access to a color darkroom at the Lewiston Creative Photographic Art Center to print a backlog of work in exchange for advising the Center’s photography students.

In 2005 Ramona started a newsmagazine, Maine Insights, which continues to this day. By 2012 she decided to show more of her fine art and has exhibited around the world.

See more of Ramona’s work here.  And at the gallery’s site here.

SugarWood Gallery is located at 248 Broadway in Farmington and is open Monday thru Friday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.