Maine’s Books about the Coast

Growing Up on an Island Off the Coast of Maine

Of the many books that have been written about the people who live on islands off the Maine coast, few are by individuals who were born and raised on an island. This book is an exception.

“Born in 1927, Carroll M. Haskell (known as ‘Cabbage’ to most islanders) grew up on Deer Isle, graduating from Stonington High School in 1945. Over the years, he did all the things island boys did: besides getting into mischief, he clammed, went lobstering, worked on the granite quarry, and went yachting, before settling into a career with the telephone company.

"Cab" Haskell photo by Ramona du Houx

“Cab” Haskell photo by Ramona du Houx

“So here is an authentic voice, the ‘real deal,’ giving us an insider’s account of what island life was like during the difficult years of the Depression and World War II, a period when old island ways were about to give way to a changed world. At the same time, we may delight in the adventures of this resourceful and free-spirited lad, as he confronted the challenges of growing up in a distinct place and time.”

— William A. Haviland

To order:
Growing Up on an Island Off the Coast of Maine by Carroll M. Haskell, Quality Paperback, 296 pages, 48 illustrations, ISBN 9781882190096
Published by Polar Bear & Company
US $16.95 add $4 for shipping and handling in USA.

Order saying you saw this write up on Insights and deduct $5 from your total.

Please send check or money order to Polar Bear & Company, PO Box 311, Solon, Maine, 04979

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At the Place of the Lobsters and Crabs: Indian People and Deer Isle, Maine, 1605–2005

by William A. Haviland

For thousands of years, native people lived, loved and labored on Deer Isle as well as the surrounding islands and peninsulas of east Penobscot Bay. Then, just over 400 years ago, their lives were disrupted by the arrival of strangers who, over the next 150 years, took control of their homeland. But the original people didn’t just go away. Instead, they survived this assault by adapting in creative ways to life in a world controlled by others.

This book is the story of their cultural survival in one particular neighborhood of the Maine coast over the past 400 years.

“Haviland’s work fills a long void since the last Indian romanticized tales that flourished in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Haviland’s research breaks barriers in citing the Indian families that continued to live in their traditional manner and gained acceptance as well-respected citizens in their communities during the 19th and 20th centuries.” — Nicholas Smith, PhD

“Haviland’s own culture as an American, a Mainer, a scholar with a lifetime connection to Deer Isle, all weave together in the tale of a place in Maine and the native population that occupied that area over time. Although Haviland is not a Native American, his unique perspective and open-mindedness have crafted a narrative that honors the Maine Native American Wabanaki who have historically occupied this place.” — James Eric Francis, Sr., Tribal Historian Penobscot Nation.

Published in cooperation with the Deer Isle- Stonington Historical Society

To order:

At the Place of the Lobsters and Crabs: Indian People and Deer Isle, Maine, 1605–2005, 120pp, Quality Paperback, ISBN 978-1-882190-97-3 Published by Polar Bear & Company
US $12.95 add $4 for shipping and handling in USA.

Order saying you saw this write up on Insights and deduct $5 from your total.

Please send check or money order to Polar Bear & Company, PO Box 311, Solon, Maine, 04979
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