The place where artists and writers with Maine connections are showcased.

Posts from the ‘Community’ category

Global Warming Conflicts and Solutions -Documentary to Make Change


The Solon Center for Research and Publishing has agreed to publish books based upon this documentary project which highlights conflicts around the globe that are a direct result of climate change and how community solutions, already available, could help defuse these problems. These videos, and a full-length film will be the basis of the books we will publish.

If you’d like to donate for the creation of the videos please do so through the Solon Center HERE. Small donations ($10) to large contributions (any amount) make a huge difference! None of the film is stock footage.

More from the project’s director, Alexander Cornell du Houx’s:

Background—

My deployment to Fallujah, Iraq, with the Marine Corps infantry, gave me a firsthand insight into why it’s critical to find solutions to the water insecurity connected to climate change.

While on patrol just outside the city, a roadside bomb hit my HUMVEE. Fortunately for us, most of the blast missed our vehicle. When we caught our assailant we learned that he was a farmer with little or no explosives experience. Because of climate change, his crops had failed. Vulnerable, in need of funds for survival, he was turned into a terrorist paid to attack Americans. For me, the connection between climate change and water insecurity became crystal clear.

Soon thereafter, I started to put the pieces together on how climate change and water insecurity are inseparable.

screen-shot-2016-10-26-at-10-14-12-am

Mission—

Our mission is to film short videos and a documentary on the impact of climate change on water security, and how clean energy and sustainable agriculture, as it relates to climate change can help combat the situation, educate community leaders, lawmakers and the public.

We aim to inspire community action, the media and lawmakers to combat climate change and promote water security.

These short videos, paired with trainings and policy initiatives, will foster climate solutions across the U.S. and world.

Water is our major focus. Most people are unaware that 40 out of 50 U.S. states expect water shortages in 10 years, according to the Government Accountability Office. At the same time foreign corporations are currently buying up U.S. water rights. Internationally, the United Nations has identified 37 conflicts in the last 50 years caused by trans-boundary water rights. Additionally, U.S. intelligence agencies recently reported that water is a major source of instability and potential conflict. According to Picture Motion, a film advocacy organization, the last project to highlight this issue was in a documentary 10 years ago for about 20 minutes. Read more

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Climate Change Causes Conflicts-Documentary Project to Bring Change

A short clip to help raise funds for the initiative from its director, Alexander Cornell du Houx:

The Solon Center for Research and Publishing has agreed to publish books based upon this documentary project which highlights conflicts around the globe that are a direct result of climate change and how community solutions, already available, could help defuse these problems. These videos, and a full-length film will be the basis of the books we will publish.

If you’d like to donate for the creation of the videos please do so through the Solon Center HERE. Small donations ($10) to large contributions (any amount) make a huge difference! None of the film is stock footage.

More from the project’s director, Alexander Cornell du Houx’s:

Background—

My deployment to Fallujah, Iraq, with the Marine Corps infantry, gave me a firsthand insight into why it’s critical to find solutions to the water insecurity connected to climate change.

While on patrol just outside the city, a roadside bomb hit my HUMVEE. Fortunately for us, most of the blast missed our vehicle. When we caught our assailant we learned that he was a farmer with little or no explosives experience. Because of climate change, his crops had failed. Vulnerable, in need of funds for survival, he was turned into a terrorist paid to attack Americans. For me, the connection between climate change and water insecurity became crystal clear.

Soon thereafter, I started to put the pieces together on how climate change and water insecurity are inseparable.

screen-shot-2016-10-26-at-10-14-12-am

Mission—

Our mission is to film short videos and a documentary on the impact of climate change on water security, and how clean energy and sustainable agriculture, as it relates to climate change can help combat the situation, educate community leaders, lawmakers and the public.

We aim to inspire community action, the media and lawmakers to combat climate change and promote water security.

These short videos, paired with trainings and policy initiatives, will foster climate solutions across the U.S. and world.

Water is our major focus. Most people are unaware that 40 out of 50 U.S. states expect water shortages in 10 years, according to the Government Accountability Office. At the same time foreign corporations are currently buying up U.S. water rights. Internationally, the United Nations has identified 37 conflicts in the last 50 years caused by trans-boundary water rights. Additionally, U.S. intelligence agencies recently reported that water is a major source of instability and potential conflict. According to Picture Motion, a film advocacy organization, the last project to highlight this issue was in a documentary 10 years ago for about 20 minutes.

Phase 1—

The first phase of our video project will be to visit 18 states to film the dangers and solutions of climate and water security as highlighted by lawmakers and their communities.

As a former state lawmaker, I have the network to start filming immediately.

Every short video will help raise awareness of local climate issues, and will also be used to help promote the full-length documentary that will be filmed after the completion of the short videos.

We have a guaranteed audience, as each lawmaker will want to showcase themselves and their community. A California state senator, for example, has close to a million constituents.

Organizing through storytelling—

Working with communities by telling their stories is key. During each state visit, we will also conduct value-based communications training, provide a print story with photos, press release, and social media meme to promote the videos and documentary.

Phase 2—

The next stage is to select footage from the videos from each state to be used in our full-length documentary.

To finish the film we’ll travel to areas that need their issues highlighted. As the world heats up with climate change, the increasing lack of fresh water is causing conflicts around the globe. But there is hope — real solutions are already making a difference. Through a character driven style, we will chronicle the dangers and solutions to water security and climate change from the Middle East, to Africa, Asia, the Pacific and the Americas.

Adrian Grenier from HBO’s Entourage, Anna Day, an award winning Journalist and DKC News in NYC, who produces Ken Bern’s films, are already committed to the project once the necessary funds are raised.

Non-profit Waterville Creates! awarded $1.5 million Alfond grant

Screen Shot 2015-12-19 at 1.22.58 PM

By Ramona du Houx in Maine Insights

Waterville Creates! has been awarded $1.5 million in grants from the Harold Alfond Foundation that will “help establish Waterville Creates! and support work of Waterville Creates! partners,” increasing arts and culture programming in the city.

“Waterville Creates! has brought together Waterville’s major arts organizations,” said Greg Powell, chairman of the Harold Alfond Foundation. “This funding confirms our commitment to supporting the Waterville Creates! mission to lead the marketing and programming efforts on behalf of the Waterville’s arts and cultural institutions.”

Screen Shot 2015-12-19 at 1.23.20 PM“It will help ensure ongoing efforts to increase the collaborative programming of Waterville Creates! partners — the Colby Museum of Art, Maine Film Center, Waterville Main Street, Waterville Opera House, Waterville Public Library and Common Street Arts,” said the chairman of the Waterville Creates! board, Larry Sterrs. “This effort has already increased recognition of the importance of these organizations to the vitality of central Maine and helped to continue the Waterville renaissance in benefit to its citizens locally and regionally.”

Waterville Creates! works to enhance the arts and cultural institutions in the city.

Maine Humanities Council to honor Passamaquoddy Historian Soctomah

This month, Passamaquoddy Tribal Historian Donald Soctomah will receive the 2015 Constance H. Carlson Public Humanities Prize from the Maine Humanities Council.

William ‘Bro’ Adams, Chairman of the National Endowment for Humanities and former president of Colby College, will be on hand to honor Soctomah at the prize luncheon in Bangor on March 30th. The luncheon will also feature recorded comments from Senator Angus King and a letter from Senator Susan Collins in appreciation of Soctomah’s contributions to the state of Maine. Those contributions are vast.

Soctomah, a 59-year-old Passamaquoddy historian, has worked tirelessly to preserve and share native culture and lands through resource management, policy-making, teaching, and the promotion and dissemination of history and language. Thanks to his efforts during eight years in the Maine State Legislature, Maine K-12 students learn about Maine Native American history in school, and Maine place names now show cultural awareness and sensitivity toward the state’s native populations. Read more

Call for Citizen Storytellers to participate in The Hook Story Hour in Hallowell

The Hallowell Lyceum Series is calling for storytellers to participate in The Hook Story Hour on May 8, 2015 at Hallowell City Hall Auditorium. Based on the popular radio show “The Moth Radio Hour” heard on MPBN, The Hook Story Hour will be an evening of stories based on real life experiences in the Kennebec Valley told live in front of a supportive audience. The Hook is an old name for an area in the city of Hallowell. Read more

Happy Chinese New Year!

By Ramona du Houx in Maine Insights.

February 19, 2015 marks the Chinese New Year, which is the longest national holiday in China, spanning a total of fifteen days. New Year’s Day is the most important date in the Chinese calendar.

Children are given red envelopes filled with money to bring happiness and good fortune on New Year’s Eve. Some children will sleep with their envelopes, which are considered to be good luck, under their pillow for up to seven days to increase their fortunes.

2015 is the year of the goat and/or sheep because the Chinese character “yang” can translate in colloquial Chinese as either sheep or goat. It is a special year for those born in 1919, 1931, 1943, 1967, 1979, 1991 or 2003 and they can count their lucky colors as brown, red and purple.

2.8 billion trips are made across China in what is known as chun yun, when students, migrant workers and office employees living away from home trek back to celebrate New Year’s with their families. It’s the world’s largest annual human migration.

KVAA & UMA Present “Higher Forms of Art” Annual High School Art Exhibition in March

“Celtic Owl” by Mikaela Gibbs, Block Print, Maranacook Community High School

“Celtic Owl” by Mikaela Gibbs, Block Print, Maranacook Community High School

Higher Forms of Art, an exhibition of artwork by students from nine central Maine high schools will be on view in the Richmond Gallery in University of Maine at Augusta’s Handley Hall at 331 Water Street in downtown Augusta from March 6-28, 2015.

In celebration of Youth Art Month the Kennebec Valley Art Association (KVAA) is partnering with UMA to present the 9th annual exhibition of artwork from area high schools. 2015 marks the 2nd year in a row that Higher Forms of Art is being presented in partnership with UMA, in the spirit of the KVAA’s mission to connect and celebrate art, artists and community. Read more

Sculptor Transforms Maine Fishermen’s Trash

MPBN’s Tom Porter reports on New York artist Orly Genger’s sculptures made out of discarded rope purchased from Maine fishermen. An excerpt from his report:

PORTLAND, Maine – A New York-based artist has become an unlikely source of revenue for a lot of Maine lobstermen. Internationally-renowned sculptor Orly Genger makes massive works of art using rope – particularly discarded lobster line.

Genger’s latest project is a monumental sculpture to be installed in South Korea next year, utilizing more than 3 million feet of rope. And to craft the piece, she’s prepared to pay fishermen good money for outdated trap lines they don’t have much use for. Read more