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Posts from the ‘Photography’ category

Fukurou’s book writing/art contest exhibit Sept 14 in Rockland Featured

The front cover of Coastal Maine in Words and Art – Photo titled Vanishing Point by Yohaku Yorozuya. And the back cover – Moonstruck by Ramona du Houx – the other the artist in the book/exhibit.

From Maine Insights News: Winners of Maine’s Solon Center for Research and Publishing’s first book writing/art contest announced — Exhibit opening September 14th at Fukurou Gallery in Rockland

See the article HERE.

The front cover of Coastal Maine in Words and Art – Photo titled Vanishing Point by Yohaku Yorozuya. And the back cover – Moonstruck by Ramona du Houx – the other the artist in the book/exhibit.                                  

The Solon Center for Research and Publishing announced its first writing/art project in conjunction with an exhibit at the center’s gallery, Fukurou, this past spring. The challenge for writers was to choose a fine art photograph that will be exhibited and write a story based on the image. The combination marries visual arts with the written word, helping Maine’s creative economy flourish. This unique new platform for writers in Maine brings the artistic community together with wordsmiths, which offers exciting unforeseen collaborations.

The result of our contest was pleasantly overwhelming. SCRP received eighty-eight entries to go with twenty-three images. Because of the quality of the submissions we decided some of the photographs would be paired with more than one story.

The images depict Rockland and the coast in its myriad situations, moods and emotions. “Our writers told stories with depth, insight, candor, irony, wit and humor. Anyone who has every visited Maine’s coast will be able to relate to them. They’ve put humankind’s instinctive emotional connection to the sea into words,” said Ramona du Houx, President and co-founder of the Solon Center for Research and Publishing.

The stories with art are published in Coastal Maine in Words and Art, which will be sold during the exhibit, on amazon, at local Maine bookstores, in the gallery, and worldwide through Ingram. Our winners herald from across Maine. Some have been published before, but for the vast majority this is their first book publication.

 

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The writers are: Mark Aufiery, Eola Ball, S.M. Belair, M. E. Brinton, Donna Chellis, Diana Coleman, Steve Feeney, N.T. Franklin, Lee Heffner, Donna Hinkley, Khristina Marie Landers, Rosemarie Nervelle, Ed Peele, Lynn Smith, Sandra Sylvester, Lee Van Dyke, and John Holt Willey.

The opening night reception will be a book-signing night celebration with authors and the fine art photographers Yohaku Yorozuya and Ramona du Houx from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. on September 14th at Gallery Fukurou, 20 Main Street, Rockland.

Every writer published will receive a free book and promotion of their story on our multiple platforms. The exhibit will run to November. All proceeds from the sales of books and art will be placed into a fund for next year’s exhibit of the same kind. The book will be available for sale world-wide, the day of the book signing event September 14th.

The Maine Humanities Council has provided a generous grant for our project that will enable us to donate books to libraries across Maine. MHC is a statewide non-profit organization that uses the humanities, as a tool for positive change in Maine communities.”


Cellardoor Winery of Lincolnville graciously donated their delicious wine that captures the essence of Maine for the opening night reception. Cellardoor is a special local winery with a philosophy of giving back to their community and the State of Maine. Their logo, based on a Hobo symbol carved into their farm’s barn door by a traveler who left it as a signal to others that they too would find hospitality there, is the winery’s guiding spirit. As their website states, “when you see our Hobo symbol, know that you are in a safe and friendly place.” positive change in Maine communities.” https://mainehumanities.org/

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More about a photographic artist, Yohaku Yorozuya, in the book—

Yohaku is an artist with gallery Fukurou. He is renowned for his use of classic darkroom techniques. He’s used Ansel Adams’ zone system, polarization, solarization, as well as a camera obscura and many other methods over his career. He sometimes develops his images using ocean water, following a tradition of a few of the masters. He is a true craftsman, ensuring that all his techniques are personally applied in the darkroom. Some of his images are prophetic, like the Twin Towers series, which depicts the Towers in the 1980s, when he felt compelled to extensively record them from various perspectives. His images immortalize their memory.

Yohaku (aka Takafumi Suzuki) is professor at Nihon University in Tokyo, where for many years he led the Department of Photography at the College of Art. He is the assistant dean and professor at the University of International Fashion in Tokyo, with branches in Osaka and Nagoya. He is a director of the Japan Society for Arts and History of Photography, as well as a member of Kokugakai (Society of Masters of Modern Japanese Art), the Japan Society of Image Arts and Sciences, and the Photographic Society of Japan.

The Solon Center’s Gallery Fukurouhttps://galleryfukurou.com/

Fukurou means owl in Japanese as well as prosperity and health. The owl in Ancient Greece often is associated with Athena, the arts and wisdom. Our gallery represents Maine artists, and fosters cross-cultural connections with Japanese artists and others. We work to help the humanities flourish in communities across Maine. Our books have themes of long-term intrinsic value and are published through our imprint, Polar Bear & Company.

The Solon Center for Research and Publishing is a 501(c)3 nonprofit Maine Public Benefit Corporation that helps build community in Maine and beyond through educational, literary, scientific and artistic means, with publications, research, exhibits, events and other initiatives. SCRP is also a platform where people from diverse disciplines can examine issues of cultural and environmental importance, while developing connections. http://soloncenter.com/

Maine’s mystical ships by Ramona du Houx – May 2016 exhibit

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Seascapes

“Our bodies consist of the same proportion of water as the earth. We are creatures of the sea. The draw of the ocean has been written about time and again. There is something more vast and more mysterious about the sea than anything else on earth. It’s something similar to the vastness and mystery of the universe itself. Our planet is just one in our solar system which is connected by the vastness of space. Is the relationship we have with the ocean a microscopic reflection of the relationship our Earth has to space?” said Ramona du Houx.

“How people interact with the ocean, from feeling at one under sail with the winds at the back to simply watching waves lap the shores, transmits a calmness, a wholeness. That peace is something I wish to convey in my work.”

Maine researchers discover increased carbon dioxide enhances plankton growth – opposite of what was expected

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Coccolithophore blooms photographed from a far and up close. Photo Credits: Ocean Ecology Laboratory, Ocean Biology Processing Group NASA Goddard Space Center.

Science study reports that coccolithophores’ abundance has increased by an order of magnitude since 1960s, significantly changing the ocean’s garden.

Coccolithophores—tiny calcifying plants that are part of the foundation of the marine food web—have been increasing in relative abundance in the North Atlantic over the last 45 years, as carbon input into ocean waters has increased. Their relative abundance has increased 10 times, or by an order of magnitude, during this sampling period.

“This provides one example on how marine communities across an entire ocean basin are responding to increasing carbon dioxide levels. Such real-life examples of the impact of increasing CO2 on marine food webs are important to point out as the world comes together in Paris next week at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change,” said Dr. William Balch, senior research scientist at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.

This finding was diametrically opposed to what scientists had expected since coccolithophores make their plates out of calcium carbonate, which is becoming more difficult as the ocean becomes more acidic and pH is reduced.

“The results show both the power of long-term time-series of ocean observations for deciphering how marine microbial communities are responding to climate change and offer evidence that the ocean garden is changing,” said Dr. Balch.

These findings were reported in the November 26th edition of Science and based on analysis of nearly a half century of data collected by the long-running Sir Alister Hardy Foundation (SAHFOS) Continuous Plankton Recorder sampling program. Read more

Maine Landscape Art of Ramona du Houx – November 2015 exhibit

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Ramona du Houx uses the camera with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered back in 1979, in New York, uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the photographic viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

“Moving the camera like a paint brush can create a sense of being personally close to an object through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Landscapes show this well because of their never-ending vastness that somehow surrounds us in an embrace. For me landscapes inspire contemplation, and patience. That and the sensation of being at home, welcomed by nature’s warmth,” said Ramona.

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Photographic landscapes with the painters lense of Ramona du Houx

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Ramona du Houx uses the camera with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered back in 1979, in New York, uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the photographic viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

“Moving the camera like a paint brush can create a sense of being personally close to an object through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Landscapes show this well because of their never-ending vastness that somehow surrounds us in an embrace. For me landscapes inspire contemplation, and patience. That and the sensation of being at home, welcomed by nature’s warmth,” said Ramona.

For more about Ramona du Houx please go to her website here.

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Photographic series: People at Work- The Low Wage Earners of Maine by Jeff Kirlin

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This documentary following photographic series, People at Work: The Low Wage Earners of Maine, which depicts some of our fellow neighbors who work for the state’s minimum wage of just $7.50 an hour. The dedicated photographer, Jeff Kirlin, works in his free time documenting them. This is just a sample from his series.

“The photography project was started after I was told by a person, in a position to help bring about a higher minimum wage, that he didn’t feel it was a real problem because it hasn’t been brought to his personal attention,” said Jeff, a speech therapist and Bangor based photographer. “This project is intended to give, not a voice, but a platform for those earning low wages and their supporters, and how their lives are affected by stagnant wages.”

Please consider sharing these images. #MaineLivingWage #RaiseTheWage

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The Photographic Art of Takafumi Suzuki – (Yohaku Yorozuya)

The Photographic Art of Takafumi Suzuki – (Yohaku Yorozuya)

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Professor Takafumi Suzuki, also known as Yohaku Yorozuya, has had multiple exhibits over his forty year career as a photographic artist. He is renowned for his use of classic darkroom techniques spending days perfecting his images. This exhibit, in the slideshow above, is called Hindsight. Many of the images were taken years before historic events that changed the world. Read more