The place where artists and writers with Maine connections are showcased.

Posts from the ‘Photography’ category

Maine’s mystical ships by Ramona du Houx – May 2016 exhibit Featured

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Seascapes

“Our bodies consist of the same proportion of water as the earth. We are creatures of the sea. The draw of the ocean has been written about time and again. There is something more vast and more mysterious about the sea than anything else on earth. It’s something similar to the vastness and mystery of the universe itself. Our planet is just one in our solar system which is connected by the vastness of space. Is the relationship we have with the ocean a microscopic reflection of the relationship our Earth has to space?” said Ramona du Houx.

“How people interact with the ocean, from feeling at one under sail with the winds at the back to simply watching waves lap the shores, transmits a calmness, a wholeness. That peace is something I wish to convey in my work.”

Maine researchers discover increased carbon dioxide enhances plankton growth – opposite of what was expected

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Coccolithophore blooms photographed from a far and up close. Photo Credits: Ocean Ecology Laboratory, Ocean Biology Processing Group NASA Goddard Space Center.

Science study reports that coccolithophores’ abundance has increased by an order of magnitude since 1960s, significantly changing the ocean’s garden.

Coccolithophores—tiny calcifying plants that are part of the foundation of the marine food web—have been increasing in relative abundance in the North Atlantic over the last 45 years, as carbon input into ocean waters has increased. Their relative abundance has increased 10 times, or by an order of magnitude, during this sampling period.

“This provides one example on how marine communities across an entire ocean basin are responding to increasing carbon dioxide levels. Such real-life examples of the impact of increasing CO2 on marine food webs are important to point out as the world comes together in Paris next week at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change,” said Dr. William Balch, senior research scientist at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.

This finding was diametrically opposed to what scientists had expected since coccolithophores make their plates out of calcium carbonate, which is becoming more difficult as the ocean becomes more acidic and pH is reduced.

“The results show both the power of long-term time-series of ocean observations for deciphering how marine microbial communities are responding to climate change and offer evidence that the ocean garden is changing,” said Dr. Balch.

These findings were reported in the November 26th edition of Science and based on analysis of nearly a half century of data collected by the long-running Sir Alister Hardy Foundation (SAHFOS) Continuous Plankton Recorder sampling program. Read more

Maine Landscape Art of Ramona du Houx – November 2015 exhibit

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Ramona du Houx uses the camera with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered back in 1979, in New York, uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the photographic viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

“Moving the camera like a paint brush can create a sense of being personally close to an object through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Landscapes show this well because of their never-ending vastness that somehow surrounds us in an embrace. For me landscapes inspire contemplation, and patience. That and the sensation of being at home, welcomed by nature’s warmth,” said Ramona.

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Photographic landscapes with the painters lense of Ramona du Houx

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Ramona du Houx uses the camera with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered back in 1979, in New York, uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the photographic viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

“Moving the camera like a paint brush can create a sense of being personally close to an object through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Landscapes show this well because of their never-ending vastness that somehow surrounds us in an embrace. For me landscapes inspire contemplation, and patience. That and the sensation of being at home, welcomed by nature’s warmth,” said Ramona.

For more about Ramona du Houx please go to her website here.

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Photographic series: People at Work- The Low Wage Earners of Maine by Jeff Kirlin

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This documentary following photographic series, People at Work: The Low Wage Earners of Maine, which depicts some of our fellow neighbors who work for the state’s minimum wage of just $7.50 an hour. The dedicated photographer, Jeff Kirlin, works in his free time documenting them. This is just a sample from his series.

“The photography project was started after I was told by a person, in a position to help bring about a higher minimum wage, that he didn’t feel it was a real problem because it hasn’t been brought to his personal attention,” said Jeff, a speech therapist and Bangor based photographer. “This project is intended to give, not a voice, but a platform for those earning low wages and their supporters, and how their lives are affected by stagnant wages.”

Please consider sharing these images. #MaineLivingWage #RaiseTheWage

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The Photographic Art of Takafumi Suzuki – (Yohaku Yorozuya)

The Photographic Art of Takafumi Suzuki – (Yohaku Yorozuya)

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Professor Takafumi Suzuki, also known as Yohaku Yorozuya, has had multiple exhibits over his forty year career as a photographic artist. He is renowned for his use of classic darkroom techniques spending days perfecting his images. This exhibit, in the slideshow above, is called Hindsight. Many of the images were taken years before historic events that changed the world. Read more

Hillary Clinton in Maine photos and article by Ramona du Houx

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Article and photos by Ramona du Houx

“We can raise incomes again — because that is the single most important issue we face. People have to feel that their work has been rewarded. Prosperity has to be broadly shared,” said Hillary Clinton, the front-runner for the Democratic nomination in the 2016 presidential race during a campaign town-hall style event in Portland, Maine.

The King Middle-School event of 400 supporters had an overflow of participants who watched on monitors in an adjoining room. Those who stood in line by 2pm, for the 4pm event, sat comfortably in a semi-circle surrounding Clinton as she outlined her comprehensive agenda— that mainly focused on incomes and job growth for the middleclass and low-income earners.

She said the way in which to achieve that growth is with Democrats, “Our country does better, our economy does better when there is a Democrat in the White House… They (Republicans) want to return to the failed politics of trickle-down economics. They want to make it easier for the super rich, and corporations to have their way. That didn’t work for America before…” Read the entire article in Maine Insights HERE.