The place where artists and writers with Maine connections are showcased.

Posts tagged ‘Photographic art of Ramona du Houx’

Gallery Insights exhibit of Maine artists for February, 2015

Every month Gallery Insights showcases the unique work of artists with Maine connections.

February, 2015

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February’s exhibit showcases some of the work of INSIGHTS highlighted Gallery artists.

Professor Takafumi Suzuki, also known as Yohaku Yorozuya, has had multiple exhibits over his forty year career as a photographic artist. He is renowned for his use of classic darkroom techniques spending days perfecting his images.

Ramona du Houx uses the camera with a painter’s eye. The technique she discovered back in 1979, in New York, uses movement to create a sense of wonder through colors, textures, memories, and the seasons. Everything within the photographic viewfinder becomes visibly interconnected when objects merge with the motion of the camera as the image, the “lightgraph,” is taken.

Jeremy Frey is known for creating beautiful works with innovative texture and use of materials that continue styles and forms passed down through generations of Wabanaki and Passamaquoddy artists.

Jos Ruks, from the Netherlands, is fascinated by sails and the natural world. He captures the wind’s motion in paper sails, kites, and mobiles. Some of his mobiles are powered by solar electricity and dance above visitors in the gallery as their lights turn on. In the stillness of some of his set pieces there is always the sense of motion and emotion, which captivates. His maps and historical perspectives convey the mystery of time.

To learn more about them and their work please go HERE.

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Du Houx’s December exhibit at Berry’s continues until February from popular demand

by Morgan Rogers
First published in Maine Insights
The inside gallery at Berry’s, 153 Main St, downtown Waterville, features the artwork, Ramona du Houx. Due to popular demand the show, which started in December continues throughout January. Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Some find them nostalgic and some mystical. Many have said the images have a healing nature. See more at http://www.photographybyramonaduhoux.com.

Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative and the Harlow Gallery. She currently has another exhibit until the end of the month at the Constellation Gallery, 511 Congress Street, in Portland, Maine.

“For me art reflects where we live in our communities, as well as where an artist is in their heart, mind and soul,” said Ramona. “In 1979 I began to paint with my camera to depict the interconnectedness of nature. I took the initial results to the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where they recorded them long ago. The continuing results have been unpredictable, intriguing, and thought provoking.”

The photographic watercolor technique is always a challenge. Read more

Ramona du Houx exhibits lightgraphs at Berry’s downtown Waterville, Maine


By Morgan Rogers (this article first appeared in Maine Insights)

The inside gallery at Berry’s Stationers 153 Main St, downtown Waterville, features the artwork, Ramona du Houx, until December 30, 2014.

Ramona du Houx creates fine art photography that looks like watercolor paintings evoking mystery and a sense of wonder. Many find them nostalgic and some mystical.

Ramona is currently represented by Gallery Storks of Tokyo, Japan and is also a member of the Maine Artist Collaborative where she exhibits regularly at the Constellation Gallery in Portland, Maine.

“For me art reflects where we live in our communities, as well as where an artist is in their heart, mind and soul,” said Ramona. “In 1979 I began to paint with my camera to depict the interconnectedness of nature. I took the initial results to the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where they recorded them long ago. The continuing results have been unpredictable, intriguing, and thought provoking.” Read more

Harlow’s Holiday Hodgepodge in Hallowell, Maine

Sails by Ramona du Houx

Sails by Ramona du Houx

In December, the Harlow Gallery at 160 Water Street in Hallowell presents a NEW fundraiser, “Holiday Hodgepodge”, a showcase of fine art and craft, including contemporary and vintage original art. Artwork can be purchased off the wall and taken home the same day; 50% of any sold work will benefit programming at the Harlow Gallery while 50% will go to the artist.

The show will run December 3-13, 2014 with an opening reception on Wednesday, December 3, 5-8 p.m. The exhibition and opening reception are free and open to the public. On Tuesday, December 2, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. the Harlow Gallery board of directors will host a Gala Preview & Presale event with a $10 entry fee per person, with refreshments and live music. Regular gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 12-6 p.m.

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Investing in the next big name artist in Maine: Ramona du Houx

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By Lisa Crothers, July, 28th, 2014

How do we spend wisely considering factors like: a still unstable economy, sky-high gas prices, droughts causing food supplies to increase – only to name a few things here. We still want to make investments and decorate our homes, so what can we do if we cannot head to Christies and bid on that Monet? As patrons of the Arts and Humanities commitment and investment are the grounding principles. A few years ago when I became invested in the arts community, I took down all of the “reproduced art” in my living space, recommitting myself to original art. My walls are still pretty bare, but the satisfaction is in knowing that over the years, piece by piece, careful selection by selection, I will have invested in the arts and the economy.

What does that have to do with Investing?

Invest in local art!

It goes back to spending wisely. Investments in original art can often bring in a nice return. I am pasting a link here for a great article written in The Telegraph – “Investing in art: how to make money by discovering the next Monet”

Where do I find artist to Invest in? Read more

America is always on the move, the exhibit at the Constellation Gallery reflects our independent spirit

This article first appeared on Maine Insights, by Morgan Rogers

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The Constellation Gallery, home of the Maine Artists Collective, is pleased to announce their Movement exhibit for July. America is a forever-changing nation– always on the move, this exhibit reflects the country’s independent spirit. The exhibit will have works from 11 different artists on display, with their creations to marvel at, to contemplate, and to sense the world of movement in.

The Constellation Gallery has brought together unique visions of movement, which represents the diversity of the artists and their various mediums.

Kate, Sanders-Fleming’s piece, Back At Home, a 3 x 4 foot oil painting, was chosen for as the Best of Show. There are many interpretations for this powerful work, which Kate embraces. For some, Back At Home depicts an apparently conflicted man in bed in different stages of action. It captures the turmoil of a waking dreaming state of mind in flux by showing us his different body movements. The warm earthy tones give the viewer the sense he’s protected.

Read more

Portland’s Constellation Gallery, Dreams exhibit has something for everyone with 27 works from 14 different artists

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Report in Maine Insights
The Constellation Gallery, home of the Maine Artists Collective, is pleased to announce their Dreams exhibit for June. The exhibit will have works from 14 different artists on display, each with their unique styles and disciplines. From paintings, cabinets of curiosity, photographs, to maps and much more the artists have created 27 works of wonder, mystery and magic.

Anastasia Weigle’s piece, Dreaming Elephants, was chosen for as the Best of Show.

“Elephants have always found their way into my art as objects of reverence or playfulness,” said Anastasia Weigle. “In Dreaming Elephants the elephant is aware of all things at all times—they are divine.”

Weigle has an extensive background in library sciences, archival processes and preservation, and book conservation. Her technical background combines with her artistic insights and skill to always create a cohesive structured body of work, which encourages the viewer to discover a piece of themselves inside her art. She has an instinctive sense of time and place and gives her creations a historic mystic— and nostalgia with a twist. Her work is always thought provoking.

The 27 artistic expressions of dreams on exhibit will stir anyone’s imagination. Some pieces calm, some excite and all inspire discussions. There is something here for everyone, which makes the exhibition stand out. Many galleries often have solo shows that require the viewer to devote themselves to one artist’s vision. The Constellation Gallery has brought together 14 different visions of dreams. This collaborative approach is key to the mission to Portland’s only non-profit art gallery collective. Read more